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Archive for tag: Tintern

Tour of Tintern

Tintern CoachStanding on the banks of the River Wye in the pretty village of Tintern, it's hard to imagine a more tranquil setting for one our biggest historical attractions.

Tintern Abbey was built in the 12th century by an order of Cistercian monks who lived in the Abbey for 400 years.  Latterly the Abbey attracted the attention of celebrated poets and artists such as Wordsworth and Turner.

Despite the shell of this grand structure being open to the skies, it remains the best-preserved medieval abbey in Wales.

These days the remains are popular with visitors to this corner of Wales and walkers exploring the nearby Wye Valley and Offa's Dyke Path.

Other attractions nearby include the Abbey Mill Craft Village and Tintern Old Station, a delightful country park with an award winning tea room based in the station's old ticket office.

For more information please click on the following links
Tintern Abbey
Abbey Mill
Tintern Old Station
Visit Wye Valley

Wonders of Wye

Tintern AbbeyThe Wye Valley and Vale of Usk is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and it's not difficult to see why. 

The rolling countryside is a magnet for walkers with some well-known and popular trails including the Offa's Dyke Path.  It is also where the Wales Coast Path begins (or ends, depending on which way around you're going).  In fact, Offa's Dyke and the coast path join up so that you can complete a whole circuit of Wales if you really want to!

The plenty of historic attractions too.  There are castles galore including the first one to be built at Chepstow and the last one too at Raglan.  One of the most impressive monuments is Tintern Abbey standing proudly on the banks of the River Wye. 

Why not combine walking with history by doing the Three Castles Walk which is a 20 mile triangular walk taking in White Castle, Skenfirth Castle and Grosmont Castle.

The area also has a reputation for excellent food.  There are plenty of top class restaurants or cosy country pubs to choose from whilst Abergavenny's Angel Hotel is renowned for its Afternoon Teas - well worth indulging.  Don't miss the Abergavenny Food Festival each September which is an excellent chance to see (and of course taste) the best of the area's produce.

For more information on the area please visit the website

St David's Day

Welsh FlagDydd Gwyl Dewi Hapus (Happy St David's Day).  Okay, I'm a couple of days early, but this week does mark our National Day and on 1st March, up and down the country, people will be celebrating.

The day commemorates our patron saint St David and marks the day he died in 589AD.  He is said to have performed many miracles including when he caused the ground to rise beneath him when preaching so that everyone could see and hear him.

The Cathedral of St David's in Pembrokeshire, where his remains are buried, became a popular place of pilgrimage.  It was said that two pilgrimages to St David's equalled one to Rome.

The highlight of the festivities is the annual St David's Day Parade through Cardiff City Centre.  Beginning from outside City Hall at 12:30 pm the parade snakes its way through the capital's streets before ending up outside (quite fittingly) St David's Hall where there will be traditional musical entertainment as well as a St David's Day Market.

If you fancy taking in one of our castles then Cadw, the organisation responsible for most of our historic sites have announced that their properties will be opened free of charge on the day.

These include the biggest castle in Wales at Caerphilly, one of the oldest at Chepstow and the best preserved medieval abbey in Wales, Tintern Abbey.  More details can be found on the Cadw website.

Porthcawl will also be marking the occasion, when the town hosts the annual Celtic Music Festival.  Dancers, singers and entertainers from all over the world descend on the seaside town for a weekend celebration of all things Celtic.

Wonderful Walking

Offa's Dyke FootpathWalking is one of the most popular activities in Wales.  When you see the scenery it's not really surprising.

There are hundreds of walks all over the country - in our towns and cities, through the countryside and along the coast.  Some are flat, some a little steeper.  All the routes offer their own challenges but if you're looking for something really testing then the biggest of the lot is the Offa's Dyke Path.

Offa's Dyke itself is the historic border between Wales and England which was built around 757AD and today the path follows this route all the way from Chepstow in the south, right the way up through the country to Prestatyn on the North Wales coast.  A total of 177 miles.

The path goes through some of the most stunning scenery in Wales - wild moorland, majestic valleys, and mysterious woodland.  It also goes through the Wye Valley, officially and Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.  Sites to look out for on the route include the market town of Chepstow with its 11th century castle standing guard over the Wales/England border, the beautiful village of Tintern and its imposing Abbey, the 3 castles of Grosmont, Skenfirth and White Castle and the 12th century Llanthony Priory, sitting in a secluded valley in the Black Mountains.

If you're up for the challenge then it's definitely worth the effort.
www.visitwyevalley.com
www.offasdyke.demon.co.uk

Spotlight on Wye Valley

Sugar Loaf MountainTo celebrate the launching of the new Visit Wye Valley website, we are taking a closer look at this picturesque corner of Wales.

The Wye Valley and Vale of Usk is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and it's not difficult to see why.  The rolling countryside is a magnet for walkers with some well known and popular trails including the Offa's Dyke Path.

The plenty of historic attractions too.  There are castles galore including the first one to be built at Chepstow and the last one too at Raglan.  One of the most impressive monuments is Tintern Abbey standing proudly on the banks of the River Wye.  There are also significant Roman remains at the nearby towns of Caerwent and Caerleon, including an amphithteatre and barraks for the soldiers.

Why not combine walking with history by doing the Three Castles Walk which is a 20 mile triangular walk taking in White Castle, Skenfirth Castle and Grosmont Castle.

This area was catapulted into the international spotlight last October when the Celtic Manor hosted Golf's Ryder Cup - one of the country's top Golf resorts.  Or if you prefer horse racing then see if you can back a winner at Chepstow Racecourse.

The area also has a reputation for excellent food.  Don't miss the Abergavenny Food Festival each September which is an excellent chance to see (and of course taste) the best of the area's produce.  It's in the Wye Valley that you'll also find two of Wales' Michelin starred restaurants - The Walnut Tree at Abergavenny and The Crown at Whitbrook.